How To Become A Licensed Plumber in Alaska

So you need to know about becoming a licensed plumber in Alaska, huh? Stay right where you are and keep reading. This article will tell you everything you need to know. First off, what is the difference between a regular plumber and one who is licensed? Licensed means they're professional. They know what they're doing and have all the information on the latest technology and policies, so they're the ones best equipped to handle your plumbing needs. If you're going to hire one, you want to make sure to hire one who is licensed. The best part about it is that if you hire a plumber who is licensed, then they have insurance that will protect your household if something goes wrong with the plumbing after you call them. Step 1: Make sure you have an Alaskan plumbing license They won't let anyone work as a plumber unless your license is specifically for Alaska. You will also need to become an apprentice to a plumber in Alaska to gain the experience that they want you to have. From there, you can become a journeyman, which will basically testify that you know what you're doing. Step 2: Register with the Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development This step is highly important because if you don't register, you will not be able to do any plumbing work in the state at all. To register with them, a fee must be paid if your license has expired up to 90 days ago and it will cost you $50. You can call them at: (907) 269-4925 to learn more. Step 3: Get your Journeyman license You will need to apply to get this license and in order to be accepted, you must have eight thousand verified hours experience plumbing subject to the UPC. You'll need to have a notarized application that verifies your work experience and it only counts if its verified from an Alaskan based union. The Journeyman Exam will cover topics such as: plumbing in general, appliance vent, gas piping and waste vent drawing and water pipe drawing. Step 4: Get your gas license For gas license, you need to have four thousand hours of experience subject to the Uniform Plumbing Code and a minimum of two thousand of those hours where you installed fuel and gas piping. Just like before, you'll have to have a notarized application to verify this through an Alaskan based union. This one will cost you $50 just to take the test and another $200 if you pass. Step 5: Get your utility license You'll need this license to install water and sewage pipes and storm drains. For this, you'll have to have a thousand hours of experience and you'll need to get it notarized just like before. You'll need $50 to take the test and $200 if you pass and you'll also have to have at least 70% of the Certification of Fitness PU exam passed. Bonus step: To go it alone, then you'll need a contractor certification for yourself, specifically a Mechanical Contractor License. You'll need to have the application completed, and be sure you have $10,000 surety bond, a certification of insurance for at least $20,00 property damage and $50,000 if someone is injured or killed, ($100,000 for multiple people), $100 application fee and a $200 license fee. And if you have workers that work for you directly, you also need to have workers compensations given to you by an insurance company with an Alaskan license. Requirements for Plumbing License in Alaska: • Certificate of Fitness • Fitness • Fitness • Plumbing Contracting License • , document of all your experience) Even though Alaska is the state that pays construction and extraction jobs, it also means that the state will put you through a more rigorous process when trying to get your Alaska plumbing license. Unlike other states, Alaska doesn't allow any plumbers to practice if their license is from another state, so you need to make sure you have your license and that you meet all the requirements for it.

There are two ways to become a licensed plumber in Alaska, one is by licensure, which requires you to apply and take an exam administered by the state department of Commerce.  The second way, is by Credentials, which means that you were previously licensed in another state as a plumber.  Alaska will review your prior … Read more