electrician salary

How much money do Electricians make? – Electrician Salary

How Much Can You Make as an Electrician?

The 2020 median pay for electricians across the U.S. was $56,900 per year or $27.36 per hour. The lowest 10th percentile of electricians makes $33,810 per year while the 90th percentile makes over $98,000. An electrician’s salary depends on the state of practice, place of employment, education, and years of work experience.

This article uses the most recent information publicized by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to discuss electrician job duties, salaries by state, salaries by industry, job market outlook, and the factors affecting electrician salaries.

Electrician Job Duties

Electricians install, maintain, and repair electrical fixtures. This includes wiring and equipment for both residential and commercial projects. Electricians may also work with service street lights, electrical control or alarm systems, or intercoms.

Most electricians are employed under general contractors. Other industries with a high number of employed electricians include local governments, employment services, utility system construction, and nonresidential building construction.

Electrician Salaries by State

The BLS has divided electrician salaries into 4 mean wage ranges in 2020.

Mean Wage Range

States

$28,050 – $51,350

UT, AZ, NM, TX, SD, AR, MS, AL, FL, SC, NC, PR

$51,360 – $56,300

ID, CO, NE, KS, OK, LA, GA, TN, KY, WV, OH, NH, VT, ME

$56,550 – $67,270

MT, WY, ND, IA, MO, WI, MI, IN, VA, DC, MD, DE, CT, RI

$67,470 – $81,650

WA, OR, NV, CA, AK, MN, IL, PA, NY, NJ, MA, HI

The Highest Paying States for Electricians

The best paying states for electricians are the following:

  • Illinois – $81,650
  • New York – $81,340
  • Hawaii – $79,280
  • District of Columbia – $79,030
  • Oregon – $76,040

States with the Most Electrician Jobs

There are currently over 700,000 electrician positions in the U.S.

Some states employ many more electricians than others. The states with the most electrician jobs are:

  • California – 71,010 employed electricians as of 2020
  • Texas – 60,890 employed electricians as of 2020
  • Florida – 41,900 employed electricians as of 2020
  • New York – 36,310 employed electricians as of 2020
  • Ohio – 23,430 employed electricians as of 2020

Electrician Salaries by Industry

The top-paying industries for electricians are:

  1. Natural gas distribution – $106,280 average annual salary
  2. Land subdivision – $99,780 average annual salary
  3. Technical and trade schools – $93,260 average annual salary
  4. Promotors of performing arts, sports, and similar events – $93,230 average annual salary
  5. General merchandise stores – $88,970 average annual salary

Electrician Job Market Outlook

The projected outlook for electricians over the next decade is positive, with a 9% expected growth in the industry. This is 1% higher than the national growth average rate of 8%.

There are an average of 84,700 projected openings for electricians in the U.S. every year through 2030. A majority of these positions are to replace other workers who have since retired or switched industries.

Factors Affecting an Electrician’s Salary

As seen above, an electrician’s salary depends heavily on the state they work in, as well as the industry in which they’re contracted. Other factors include education and years of work experience.

Education

Electricians need a high-school diploma or the equivalent to become an electrician. Afterward, electricians typically learn the skills they need through a 4- or 5-year apprenticeship program.

These apprenticeships are generally paid over 2,000 hours annually and include technical instruction. Some people with military or construction electrical experience may qualify for a shorter apprenticeship.

Electricians will learn blueprint reading, math, electrical theory, electrical code requirements, and more. Most states require electricians to pass a test to acquire a license, which then enables them to work as certified electricians. These licenses are usually renewed by completing continuing education courses. Each state has unique requirements.

The more courses and certifications an electrician takes and holds, the higher their prospective pay.

Years of Experience

As with most positions, the more experience you have under your belt, the higher you are paid for your expertise.

Indeed reported the following electrician wage increases with years of experience:

Years of Experience

Pay per Hour

<1 year

$24.10

1-2 years

$24.04

3-5 years

$27.98

6-9 years

$27.75

>10 years

$29.75+

Summary

Electricians make an average of $56,900 per year, which surpasses the average U.S. salary of $51,480. The more education and experience they have, the more an electrician can be paid, with the highest percentile reaching 6-figure salaries.

Northern regions like Illinois, New York, D.C., and Oregon pay the highest electrician salaries. Electricians working in natural gas distribution, land subdivision, technical and trade schools, performing arts industries, and general merchandise stores also receive some of the highest salaries.

Electricians have a positive job growth outlook of 9% expected between 2020 and 2030. With the possibility to work anywhere from residences to businesses to construction sites, this industry has and will be in demand for the foreseeable future.

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